Erna hamburger laureate 2019 : 

Prof Antje boetius

November 6th, 2019

Event Program SwissTech Convention Center EPFL: 

17:00  Welcome cocktail/Cocktail de bienvenue

18:00  Welcome/Bienvenue

                    Prof. A. Fontcuberta i Morral, EPFL-WISH Foundation

                    Hélène Füger, Equal Opportunities EPFL

 

18:10   A word from the President/Le mot du Président

                     Prof Martin Vetterli, Président de l’EPFL

18:15   A word from our conseillère nationale

                     Adèle Thorens, co-présidente des Verts Suisses

   

18:20  Short film/Court-métrage   

                     Anna Morales-Melgares

 

18:30  Presentation of the laureate/ Présentation de la lauréate

                      Isis Daudé, lauréate du concours d’éloquence EPFL 2019

18:35 Lecture by the Prize laureate / Conférence de la lauréate                                 Prof Antje Boetius

 

19:10  Debate on oceans & climate with our guests

                       Débat avec la laureate et nos invités 

                       Julia Binder (Tech4Impact), Danièle Rod (Swiss Polar Institute)   

                           Mrs Kim Van Arkel (Race For Water) 

19:45  Prize is awarded/Remise du Prix

20:00 Support dinner with the laureate @Gina EPFL 

              (reservation mandatory)

Antje Boetius is a German marine biologist presently serving as professor of geomicrobiology at the Max Planck Institute for Marine MicrobiologyUniversity of Bremen and Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI). 

 

She was the first person to describe anaerobic oxidation of methane and believes the Earth's earliest life forms may have subsisted on methane in the absence of molecular oxygen (instead reducing oxygen-containing compounds such as nitrate or sulfate).

She has also suggested such life forms may be able to reduce the rate of climate change in future. She is one of the laureate of the 2018 Environment Prize (German Environment Foundation)

"Living oceans are a must. Without them, we cannot exist."

She received the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize, with 2.5 million euros in funding, in March 2009 for her study of sea bed microorganisms that affect the global climate.

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